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Add Me as a Contact! on Skype. ID: DrRobertEdinger so that we can chat. Please note that I am not usually able to talk and I need your information in text form.

I work very hard on each statement that I produce because  I trust you as well to recommend me to your friends and colleagues if you are very pleased with your statement. 

CRNA Diversity, Black, white, and Japanese

An ICU nurse who is Black, white, and Japanese, I thrive on the celebration of our increasingly diversified workplace and relate well to people from all backgrounds or walks of life. The operating room is the center of my world because helping my patients as an ICU nurse is my service to my community and humanity. Day after day, preparing patients for surgery, helping them through it in the least stressful way possible, and then helping them with the most difficult days of recovery that follow – all is fundamental to my professional identity. After nursing and family, I give much of myself to my church where I serve the Lord as a musician.

For some time now, to the extent to which I have had the opportunity to do so, which is every day in ICU, I have been observing, watching, imitating CRNAs; after the patient and the surgeon, I see the CRNA as the most important person in the room. I have my sights set on becoming a CRNA and look forward to at least a half century to come of my fullest dedication to Nurse Anesthesia. I crave the responsibility of becoming a CRNA and look forward to a professional lifetime making my fullest contribution possible. I currently have 2 years of experience as a nurse, 1.5 years in cardiac ICU and have attended to patients with heart failure, shock, IABP, titrating vaso active agents, etc. The more critically ill the patient, the more I enjoy taking care of them. I feel a keen sense of accomplishment and humbleness that critically ill patients trust me to help them to get better. Every day I learn how to catch warning signs sooner than I did before and I find this enormously exciting, working in a field with such a steep learning curve and endless possibilities for the enhancement of patient care. I have progressed rapidly in my time management skills and each day I am more patient and compassionate.

I am now highly skilled in treating patients with life-threatening heart conditions including heart attacks, irregular heartbeats, heart failure and other cardiac diagnoses. I am generally assigned from 1 to 3 patients depending on the level of care that they require and I now know a great deal about Cardiovascular Surgery and Cardiac ICU care including rhythm interpretation, hemodynamics, airway management, pain management, medication management, safety precautions, patient/family education and support, and initiation of the rehabilitation process.

I see myself as a strong candidate because nearly everything I have set my mind to, I have risen to the occasion and accomplished. Friends and colleagues describe me as dependable and persistent.  10 Years from now I would like to be well established as a CRNA working towards fulfilling leadership roles in my hospital. I very much love the vast diversity – people, cases, treatments – found in our ICU. It pleases me greatly to have fully mastered much of the technology, monitors and other devices, especially mechanical ventilation. I greatly admire how our CRNAs manage their patients comprehensively from hemodynamic adjustments to airway support and I also crave the heightened responsibility and autonomy of the CRNA, performing at the highest level of commitment and achievement possible.  Nurse Anesthesia also appeals to me because of the broad variety of professional opportunities, including the VA, military, ambulatory surgery centers, trauma centers, obstetrics, and rural areas.

I have grown most comfortable in the presence of people who are stressed, scared, angry, sad, and tired, a skilled communicator with a steady personality, I never get ruffled and teamwork is my forte. Particularly when problems arise that are serious in nature - skin breakdown, falls, UTI, central line infections, I attempt to learn ways to prevent these issues in the first place. In the face of each new challenge, I am scanning for service recovery tools and performing a root cause analysis (RCA) in my mind, looking at incidents as problems that are more often than not systemic rather than individual in nature. I observe closely what was done well so as to imitate it at the same time that I am always searching for ways that it could be better still.  

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